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Property owners to receive important letter, assessor says

Judy Thorstad holds a letter like the ones sent to county property owners about 2017 valuations taxable payable in 2018. Rae Yost/Morris Sun Tribune

Property owners in Stevens County: Please pay attention to the green 2017 valuation taxes payable 2018 letter that will be received from the Stevens County Assessor's office, said county assessor Judy Thorstad.

The 2017 valuation notices will be green, letter size and were mailed March 16 in an envelope and should not be confused with the tax statements for 2016 valuations taxes payable in 2017. The 2016 tax statements should be mailed in late March or early April, the auditor's office said.

The green letter is for taxes payable in 2018.

If a property owner has questions about their taxes, they need to contact the assessor's office before the local board of appeal and equalization meetings, Thorstad said.

In Morris, there is only the one local meeting but in other cities and townships, there are two meetings and taxpayers must attend the first to appeal at the second meeting. is the local meeting and the county board of appeal and equalization. If a taxpayer wants to appeal his valuation, he must first attend the local city or township meeting in order to attend the county board of appeal and equalization meeting, Thorstad said. Appointments to attend the county meeting must be made with the assessor.

Morris property owners that don't agree with the 2017 valuation for payable 2018 and want to

must contact the assessor's office before the April board of appeal and equalization meeting to reserve their right to appeal, Thorstad said.

"Only the folders of the taxpayers that made appointments with our office are brought to the Morris Local Board of Appeal and Equalization," Thorstad said.

In Chokio, Alberta and Donnelly and in townships, property owners with questions should contact the assessor's office before the local board of appeal and equalization meetings, Thorstad said.

If a taxpayer wants to appeal his valuation, he must first attend the local city or township meeting in order to attend the county board of appeal and equalization meeting, Thorstad said. Appointments to attend the county meeting must be made with the assessor.

The assessor's office can answer questions, clarify information and set up appointments to review property, Thorstad said.

The visit with the assessor's office may answer all the questions, but, in some cases, the property owner may still want to appeal the 2017 valuation at the local board of appeal and equalization meeting, Thorstad said.

Thorstad stressed that taxpayers with any questions on the 2017 valuation taxes should contact the assessor's office.

An increase in the estimated market value does not mean the property owner's taxes will increase, Thorstad said. "Valuation is only the first step in the process," Thorstad said.

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